Leighton Buzzard narrow gauge Railway

'Doll' attached to train
‘Doll’ attached to train

In May 2019 I paid another visit to the Leighton Buzzard narrow gauge railway, not having been there for over a decade. The track, formerly used for sand extraction, runs for about two miles from Pages Park to the Stonehenge Works, past housing estates, across several roads and alongside a country road and the Redland works.
The line has a substantial collection of steam and diesel narrow gauge locomotives collected from various places. The specially adapted passenger carriages are normally steam hauled.
The run is about 25 minutes each way. There are now a number of static exhibits at the Stonehenge end which will occupy the visitor for at least the duration between trains. A further extension of the track is planned.
Passing another train
Passing another train
depot building at Stonehenge works
depot building at Stonehenge works
in engine shed
in engine shed
in engine shed
in engine shed
in engine shed
in engine shed

Dunster Castle, Somerset

House entrance
House entrance
National Trust
I first visited Dunster Castle some years ago but this account is from April 2019. Dunster Castle is a former motte and bailey castle, now a country house, in the village of Dunster, Somerset, England. The castle lies on the top of a steep hill called the Tor, and has been fortified since the late Anglo-Saxon period. After the Norman conquest of England in the 11th century, William de Mohun constructed a timber castle on the site as part of the pacification of Somerset. A stone shell keep was built on the motte by the start of the 12th century, and the castle survived a siege during the early years of the Anarchy. At the end of the 14th century the de Mohuns sold the castle to the Luttrell family, who continued to occupy the property until the late 20th century.

The castle was expanded several times by the Luttrell family during the 17th and 18th centuries; they built a large manor house within the Lower Ward of the castle in 1617, and this was extensively modernised, first during the 1680s and then during the 1760s. The medieval castle walls were mostly destroyed following the siege of Dunster Castle at the end of the English Civil War, when Parliament ordered the defences to be slighted to prevent their further use. In the 1860s and 1870s, the architect Anthony Salvin was employed to remodel the castle to fit Victorian tastes; this work extensively changed the appearance of Dunster to make it appear more Gothic and Picturesque.

Following the death of Alexander Luttrell in 1944, the family was unable to afford the death duties on his estate. The castle and surrounding lands were sold off to a property firm, the family continuing to live in the castle as tenants. The Luttrells bought back the castle in 1954, but in 1976 Colonel Walter Luttrell gave Dunster Castle and most of its contents to the National Trust, which operates it as a tourist attraction. It is a Grade I listed building and scheduled monument. (source: Wikipedia).

The interior of the house is interesting and various rooms on the ground and first floors can be seen. The gatehouse and other castle parts remain, but if you are expecting a medieval castle, look elsewhere!

The site has a number of pleasant walks curving around the hill. The top of the hill (above the house) is flat and laid as an open lawn. Below the hill is an old watermill to the south and the village of Dunster to the west. A folly tower tops a nearby hill to the north-east.

There are foot entrances from the village, but if arriving by car, the car park entrance is on the A39 north of the village.

House from below
House from below
Mill interior
Mill interior
House front
House front
Room
Room
Ceiling
Ceiling
Room
Room
Room
Room
Conservatory
Conservatory

Hall, Devon

front Privately Owned

Unusually, the name of this property is just ‘Hall’. I visited Hall under the ‘Invitation to View’ scheme.  The present house was built in the Victorian period on the site of two earlier houses.  Only ground floor rooms are open to visitors and these have some interesting contents, including some carved wood panels from one of the earlier houses.  At the back of the house is the service or North wing, unused since the 1940’s and mostly in a derelict condition. The tour concludes in the impressive Great Hall, of medieval appearance but built as the last phase of the house construction.

Most of the numerous outbuildings predate the house. There are walled gardens, one of which once contained heated greenhouses. A medieval barn remains in a perilous condition and there is in interesting granary raised on pillars to deter vermin.

Great Hall on left
Great Hall on left
Cows in front of Hall
Cows in front of Hall
Former Orangery
Former Orangery
Walled garden
Walled garden

Clevedon Court, Somerset

Entrance front National Trust

The house is of medieval origin, remodelled in Tudor times by the Wake family and further modernised in the 18th and 19th centuries by the Elton family. The floor plan is somewhat irregular. The principal downstairs room is the double-height Great Hall. A fine staircase leads up to the Thackeray Room which commemorates the house’s literary connections. Also on this floor is the large State Room, now set up as a bedroom. Adjoining it is the restored Chapel, with a fine rectangular stained-glass window with reticulated tracery.

Downstairs on the east side of the screens passage is the Justice Room, originally a medieval buttery for beer butts, and now a museum room for a collection of colourful Nailsea glassware. From the screens passage, another passage leads to a triangular courtyard. beyond is the Old Kitchen, a much altered double height room now used as an exhibition space. The Old Kitchen predates the other parts of the house.
Outside, a steeply terraced garden with summerhouses rises behind the house to the wooded land beyond.

Great Hall
Great Hall
State Room
State Room
Chapel window
Chapel window
Glasswork display
Glasswork display
Rear of house
Rear of house
View from top of garden
From top of garden

Holdenby, Northants.

House frontage Privately Owned

I visited Holdenby some years ago but have no record of the details. The recent visit was in April 2019.  The core of the house is the remains of the kitchen wing of a vast Elizabethan palace, restored and extended in the Victorian era.  Two unusual arches, once part of an entrance court, stand in the grounds.  The house is open to the public on only a few days of the year. The tour includes the entrance hall, the boudoir (sic) the piano collection room which contains a number of antique pianos and other instruments, the Pytchley Room (with sporting pictures), the Ballroom, the Inner Hall, the Library and the Dining Room.

The grounds include smaller areas of formal garden, a kitchen garden, a primitive-looking replica wattle & daub cottage and a falconry.

Below the house is an interesting church, now in the care of a preservation trust.

Nearby church
Nearby church
Church wall painting
Church wall painting
Church altar
Church altar
Ornamental Tudor arch
Ornamental Tudor arch
Replica cottage
Replica cottage

 

Parsonage Farm, Herts

general view of housePrivate.
Visited on 20 Oct 2018
Parsonage Farm is a late medieval/early Tudor timber-framed former farmhouse with an original inglenook fireplace, a signed late 16th century glass window and has original beams throughout the house. The owners have an unique collection of authentic late medieval, Tudor, Elizabethan and Stuart furniture which is on display throughout the house.
The grounds are no longer part of a farm but around the house are a vegetable garden, orchard, re-created medieval pleasure and herb gardens, Oriental-style “banqueting house”, and several other themed garden areas.
I visited the  house and grounds under the ‘Invitation to View’ scheme. The enthusiastic hosts gave a guided tour of the old rooms of the house, followed by a guided garden tour and then refreshments with the option to try some Tudor-style snacks and soft drinks, followed by a talk on various medieval subjects.

garden view
garden view
Elizabethan garden
Elizabethan garden
Period flower beds
Period flower beds
Period herbal plots
Period herbal plots
Vegetable beds
Vegetable beds
Chinese summerhouse
Chinese summerhouse
Garden feature with knights
Garden feature with knights

Old Warden, Bedfordshire

Mansion
Mansion
Private
The Old Warden estate has a number of attractions including the Shuttleworth Collection of old aircraft and cars, and the Swiss Garden. Also on the estate are the Mansion, and Queen Anne’s Summerhouse. I visited on a Heritage Open Day when the Mansion, Swiss garden and Summerhouse were opened free of charge.
The Mansion is occasionally opened to the public and the Summerhouse is normally let out by the Landmark Trust.
The Shuttleworth Collection is open daily and well worth a visit if you are interested in old aircraft, cars etc. The Swiss Garden is also open daily (charges apply).
Mansion front
Mansion front
Grand piano in entrance hall
Piano in hall
Morning Room
Morning Room
Drawing Room fireplace
Drawing Room
Saloon
Saloon
Saloon fireplace
Saloon fireplace
Dining Room
Dining Room
Study
Study
Mansion rear
Mansion rear
Swiss Cottage -in SG
Swiss Cottage -in SG
Wood Carving -in SG
Wood Carving -in SG
Stained Glass in Chapel -SG
Stained Glass in Chapel -SG
Fernery Dome -in SG
Fernery Dome -in SG
Fernery - in Swiss Garden
Fernery – in Swiss Garden
Grotto & Fernery - in SG
Grotto & Fernery – in SG
Indian Kiosk - in SG
Indian Kiosk – in SG
Queen Anne Summerhouse basement
Queen Anne Summerhouse basement
Queen Anne Summerhouse main room
Queen Anne Summerhouse main room
Queen Anne Summerhouse
Queen Anne Summerhouse
View from Queen Anne SH to mansion
View from Queen Anne SH to mansion
Queen Anne Summerhouse roof
Queen Anne Summerhouse roof

Turn End, Haddenham, Bucks

Courtyard Garden
Courtyard Garden
Private
Architect Peter Aldington designed and built three houses, The Turn, Middle Turn and Turn End in the 1960s in the village of Haddenham. Then, as now, English villages suffered from insensitive development, but Adlington set out to create a modern development that was sensitive to the village site. The three houses all have gardens, Adlington’s house Turn End having the largest garden. A number of fine trees have been preserved on the site.
The houses are the antithesis of the estate developer’s ‘box’ in their design, materials and finish, and the large Turn End garden is now widely admired. The houses are small, low and open onto internal courtyards and their gardens. The ‘plant wall’ – a kind of top-lit covered apace – is a new take on houseplants. A section of ‘witchert’ wall (non load bearing) is preserved in the house.

The houses are built mostly of blockwork, whitewashed internally (in Turn End) and the roof beams are exposed. The Town End garden is laid out in a number of sections with a variety of exotic plants.

Turn End and its garden are occasionally opened to the public and well worth a visit. When I visited in August 2018, a queue had gathered by opening time.

Garden
Garden
Office Garden
Office Garden
Garden
Garden
Interior
Interior
Plant wall
Plant wall
Interior
Interior
Bedroom/study
Bedroom/study
Garden
Garden

25-27 Church Street, Saffron Walden, Essex

frontage

Invitation to View
I visited this medieval house under the ‘Invitation to View’ scheme in August 2018. 25-27 was once part of the long closed Sun Inn. It dates approximately from the late 14th century and is particularly well known for its 17th century pargeting (decorative external render). The interior also contains much interesting historic fabric.
When I visited, the house was unmodernised, but it is currently the object of renovation. Each of the two houses (now connected) has two principal rooms downstairs and two bedrooms above in no. 27 and three in no.25. There are cellars under no.27, and small flint-walled courtyards at the rear.
The structure is predominately timber frame with a ‘crown post’ roof. The spaces within the timber frame are infilled with wattle and daub, with some brick infill.

The pargeting on no 25-27 is of the rare raised form, and includes two unique giant figures, together with birds, foliage, various architectural motifs, a dog and even a stocking.

Frontage, right
Frontage, right
Frontage, center
Frontage, center
Former Sun Inn frontage
Former Sun Inn frontage
Typical interior
Typical interior
Typical interior
Typical interior